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Archive for the 'prostate cancer questions' Category

Tissue that has been treated with radiation "don't heal well if you go a cuttin on it!" Beware.

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That the psa goes down after a course of antibiotics is encouraging...but not definitive. A better messure of things is the trending of the value of the psa over period of time. Your urologist will know how to advise you on this and the timing and necessity of a prostate biopsy.

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Since the needle that takes the prostate speciment at the time of a biopsy goes through the rectal mucosa first the possibility of an infections exists. This historically has been a low risk issue but recently and nationally it is becoming more prevalent. There is not a good answer as yet to this other than a heightened sense of awareness on the part of the patient to recognize that something is not right and to contact the urologist at the earlies sign of fever or difficulty voiding. In addition, it is making the point that a patient should thoroughly evaluate the need for the biopsy in the first place, i.e. if cancer were found would you treat it. If the answer is no and there are risks associated with the biopsy then maybe don't consent to it.

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The most common questions that arise at a pre-vasectomy consultation with a urologist.

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The newly diagnosed prostate cancer patient must use all the tools at his disposal to make a "custom made" decision tailored to him. Particulars about his life, family, and biases also weigh heavily in the decision. It is the blending of all these factors which come together with time to arrive at "hopefully" a well thought decision and specific to the patient.

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The Partin Tables "categorize" the prostate cancer of the male and aids in the decision making process.

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Myths about the benign nature of prostate cancer and the male's unwillingness to have rectal exams creates the perfect storm of late detection. Men will take a myth and use it as a rationalization not to be checked. The thinking goes…if no one dies of prostate cancer why put myself through the degrading business of a rectal exam? Do women think this way for breast exams? Well…that's the problem.

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Be careful using statistics generated by "Epidemiologists" in making your prostate cancer decision. The numbers are based on the "masses" and not on information that is specific to you and potentially make you "let your guard down" and hence a decision made in error. What do you tell the man who is diagnosed with an aggressive form of the disease, who had not been deligent about exams because he read that only 1% of people die of prostate cancer in 5 years after the diagnosis?

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Men's lack of knowledge of the prostate, the risk factors, and lack of symptoms mean nothing, often delays the diagnosis of prostate cancer. The focus of the medical community should be directed at awareness in order to prevent late diagnosis because of the male's misconceptions about this disease.

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